Significance of rituals, festivals in Hinduism

Temples host celebrations of the holy months according to the almanac and corresponding to Vedic rites. Special functions, events of dance, drama and music are hosted at the premises like Nātyasabhās, Sabhānganas, and Nātya Mantapās.

Our prayers, rituals, customs, arts and cultural heritage have meaning, beauty, significance and positive energy.

In the south, the famous temple of Chidambaram gets saturated with people thronging to see the festivities. Temples like Sun temple Konark, Khajuraho, Brihadeeshwara, cave temple like Ellora-Ajanta are chosen venues for programmes of this kind to mark the festivals.

Tāntric rituals are specially held as per the Vedic calendar, the Gregorian months being July-August [Bhagawaty Pujā] and September-October [Dassera Pujā] which is important for Devi worship.

The nine days of Navarātri signify worship for three days each for the three major Goddesses, Lakshmi Devi, Pārvaty Devi and Saraswaty Devi, being bestowers of happiness, prosperity and learning

During Krishna Janmāshtami, some rock the adorable baby Krishna in cradles, sing lullabies and songs, some imitate his pranks [the Leelas] as the butter thief and climb atop one another to break pots of butter milk while some simply find ecstasy in singing and dancing with devotion. Lord Ganeśa is brought home amidst pomp and splendour. Every year, the sculptors kindle their creative spirits and bring out such amazing images of most benevolent Lord. When he gets immersed, the form, sometimes even gigantic, reduces and merges. This is how an elegant and revered deity (goes back to where he came from) this state. It is the legend of Ganeśa who took to form, from dust, and it is significant of so many truths of life, a reflection of life cycle- the beautiful lie of birth and painful truth of death.

Dolls play an important role in our lives. Be it during childhood, be it during adolescence or be it during our later part of life. We have all been making, collecting and using dolls to keep amused at play, to adorn homes with puppets or curios, to tell stories and more than anything else, to offer our prayers symbolically as we do to our deities. The variety of dolls assembled aesthetically at Navarātri includes not only the deities, but also, men and women engaged in some activities or other like music, dancing, household chores or playing games. The various themes significantly represent the divinity in man and spread the message of love and unity, brotherhood and community development.

The nine days of Navarātri signify worship for three days each for the three major Goddesses, Lakshmi Devi, Pārvaty Devi and Saraswaty Devi, being bestowers of happiness, prosperity and learning. This symbolizes the importance given to the Goddess in our Purānas. The Energy – Parkriti that is embodied in the universal forms unites with the Spirit-Purusha which remains as the universal Self. This great truth is represented when we place a newly wedded couple, in the centre of the dolls-display, popularly called as Bommagolu/Gombegalu. The five elements are represented by the “Kalaśa”, the copper /wooden pot, containing water, mango leaves, rice, pulses, and lemon and lit brightly by a lamp.

Our prayers, rituals, customs, arts and cultural heritage have meaning, beauty, significance and positive energy. People commemorate important legendary events with new clothes, preparing and exchanging special dishes, sweetmeats, propitiating the Gods and Goddess or the saints and giving alms to the needy.

 

 

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